Lunch & Learn: Plimoth Plantation’s Lunchtime Lecture Series

Feed your brain!

Pack your lunch and join us for our hour-long Lunch & Learn lecture series! Held the first Thursday of each month from March through November, Plimoth Plantation welcomes a lineup of lively, unique guest speakers who bring big ideas, humorous tales, and adventure stories to your lunch table.

This series is free to members and just $8.00 (per lecture) for non-members, so our seats fill up quickly! Be sure to make your reservations ahead of time online by clicking the link listed for each session, or contact Kate LaPrad at (508) 746-1622 (Ext. 8361).

Not a Member yet? Click here to join and attend the entire series for free.


Lunch & Learn 2014 Schedule

 

Lunch & Learn: 17th-Century Native New England

Thursday, March 6, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Presenter: Dr. Neal Salisbury, Barbara Richmond 1940 Professor Emeritus in the Social Sciences, Smith College

Dr. Neal Salisbury will discuss Native New England in the early 17th century as well as cultural encounters between indigenous people and European colonists, fishermen and traders. Bring a lunch if you like. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Maxwell Theater in Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: “What Earthly Good Would They Do Us Alive?” A Chronicle of the Sacco-Vanzetti Protests

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Presenter: Richard Pickering, Plimoth Plantation's Deputy Director

The international protests surrounding the death sentence for Sacco and Vanzetti, brought some of America's greatest writers to Boston. John Dos Passos, Dorothy Parker, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Katherine Anne Porter all took their turns on picket lines, speaking before committees or processing petitions. Katherine Anne Porter, author of the best-selling novel Ship of Fools, the classic study of the 1918 influenza epidemic Pale Horse, Pale Rider and short stories such as The Jilting of Granny Weatherall was one of the last surviving witnesses of the protest. She died in 1980. Her Sacco-Vanzetti memoir The Never-Ending Wrong appeared in the Atlantic Monthly on the 50th anniversary of the executions. She struggled with telling the story of the crime, trial and protests for 40 years, and personal her turmoil is a reflection of controversies over free speech and political affiliation in 20th-century America. She knew the FBI was watching closely. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Accomack Building next to Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: Eugene O’Neill and the Sea

Thursday, May 1, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Robert Richter, Director of Arts Programming, Connecticut College

Eugene O'Neill's maritime period spanned just two years, a brief time in the life of a man who lived to be 65, but his days at sea and on shore would reverberate throughout his life and mark his work in innumerable ways. As America's only Nobel Prize-winning playwright and the winner of four Pulitzer Prizes, O'Neill has drawn the attention of dramatic literature scholars seeking insight into his life and into his plays, resulting in an impressive body of scholarly study and comment. But few have brought to their interpretations a comprehensive understanding of the maritime world and the culture that shaped his perspective. Mr. Richter’s talk explores the maritime communities in which O'Neill lived and the details of his time at sea, and then reflects on their influence in so many of his plays. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Accomack Building next to Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: Burial Hill and 17th-Century Plymouth Colony's Fortifications

Thursday, June 5, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Dr. David Landon, Associate Director of the Fiske Center for Archaeological Research, University of Massachusetts Boston

Before it was “Burial Hill,” Plymouth’s landmark cemetery location was called “Fort Hill,” a reference to its 17th-century fortified settlement. Historical documents and comparative data from contemporary settlements like Jamestown, Virginia, provide clues to the location, extent, and possible nature of Plymouth’s early fortifications. Join archaeologist David Landon as he describes current efforts to map the subsurface of Burial Hill and search for remains of the 17th-century fortified settlement. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Maxwell Theater in Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: RMS Titanic: Massachusetts Connections

Thursday, July 3, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Dr. Walter Powell, Executive Director of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants in Plymouth

The sinking of RMS Titanic on the morning of April 15, 1912 continues to fascinate people around the world. Join Titanic Historical Society member Walter Powell as he recalls the details of that tragic sinking and the Bay State's many  ties to the ship--from Harvard,  East Bridgewater, Indian Orchard, Worcester--and more.Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Accomack Building next to Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: Visual Images of Metacomet after King Philip's War

Thursday, August 7, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Joyce Rain Anderson, Associate Professor of English at Bridgewater State University

Dr. Anderson will discuss visual images of the Wampanoag Sachem, Metacomet, after King Philip’s War, and the shifting meaning of his representation in portraits, woodcuts, and engravings. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Accomack Building next to Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: The Restoration and Re-Launch of the Whaling Ship Charles W. Morgan

Thursday, September 4, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Dr. Elysa Engelman, Mystic Seaport: the Museum of America and the Sea, and History Department, UCONN Avery Point 

Dr. Engelman will speak on the restoration and re-launch of the historic whaling ship Charles W. Morgan. Originally built and launched in 1841, the Morgan embarked on 37 voyages between 1841 and 1921. In 2008, the Morgan underwent restoration at Mystic Seaport and was re-launched in 2013. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Accomack Building next to Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: Mashpee Indian Whalers

Thursday, October 2, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Ramona Peters, Director of Historic Preservation & NAGPRA for the Mashpee Wampanoag 

The story of Mashpee Wampanoag whalers is one with many facets. It involves Mashpee Indians engaged in the whaling industry, both by choice and by force, during a time period that spanned nearly one hundred years. Most of the heavy whaling harvest took place during the mid-19th century, but before Europeans arrived in this region the Wampanoag people hunted whales and occasionally local Sachems would divide beached animals among their people. Panels from the exhibit currently at the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Museum will also be on display during the lecture. Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Maxwell Theater in Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: “A Nice Indian Pudding”: Maize in the Diets of Colonial New Englanders

Thursday, November 6, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Dr. Karen Metheny, Visiting Research, Department of Archaeology, Boston University 

Numerous written accounts from 17th-century New England refer to maize as a food suitable only for animal fodder or a foodstuff linked to Native Americans and, therefore, undesirable and even dangerous. These accounts have informed current interpretations by food historians who argue that maize was ranked below wheat as a food source, and overlooked or denigrated by many because it was un-English. Yet this interpretation conflicts with documentary and archaeological evidence that indicates maize was integral to the colonial New England diet. In this presentation, Dr. Metheny discusses some of the evidence for the ways that New Englanders integrated maize into their diets by drawing on household receipts (recipes), cookbooks, and other print sources, as well as material and archaeological evidence. Specific attention will be given consumption practices, preparation methods, and suggested ingredients and combinations of flavors, and what the consumption of maize in colonial households reveals about cultural identity and encounters with “cultural other.” Discussion starts promptly at noon in the Accomack Building next to Plimoth Plantation's Henry Hornblower II Visitor Center.

 

Lunch & Learn: Thanksgiving: The Holiday that Swallowed the Pilgrims

Thursday, December 4, 2014, 12-1 p.m.

Free for Members/$8 for Non-Members 

Register on Eventbrite.

Presenter: Jim Baker, Former Plimoth Plantation Director of Research and Curator of the Alden Historic Site

Today it is inconceivable to consider the American Thanksgiving holiday without reference to the Pilgrims and their iconic harvest feast, or as it is inevitably termed, "The First Thanksgiving". For generations, the common understanding was that the holiday originated in Plymouth in 1621 and then celebrated ever since. However, in planning a 1983 Plimoth Plantation exhibit on the Victorian imagery of the Pilgrims, "Aye, Call It Holy Ground", we couldn't find any examples of the familiar outdoor dinner pictures or references to the "First Thanksgiving" (before 1841). Where were the historical links? Solving this